ScoreSheet

Time for the Beach: Two New Novels

By James Zug Eden Jeanne McWilliams Blasberg Berkeley, CA: She Writes Press, 2017 A family struggling to overcome devastating secrets while in a beautiful place is the core of Jeanne Blasberg’s debut novel. Blasberg is most well-known to this magazine’s readers as a squash leader. While at Smith, she picked up the game and played […]

Forty Years of Squash in the Maccabiah Games

By Sarah Odell The third largest sporting event in the world is the Maccabiah Games. Held every four years in Israel, the so-called Jewish Olympics are a major international sporting competition. Only Jewish athletes can compete, but the range of Jewish heritage is wide: some athletes have only a single Jewish grandparent, while others have […]

Murder, Demurrage and Double-Dot Deadlines: New Squash Books To Consider

By James Zug Last issue we reviewed a single book, 555, about Jahangir Khan; this issue we take on seven books ranging from novels to anthologies to coaching manuals. The Science of Sport: Squash By Stafford Murray, with Mike Hughes, Nic James and Goran Vuckovic Ramsbury, England: Crowood Press, 2016 In the late 1990s Stafford […]

Will’s World: Take Note

By Will Carlin My high school squash notebook looks like a rainbow. For some unremembered reason, I was rigorous about keeping my notes in a different color each day. Not just any color: they had to proceed systematically according to the color of the rainbow. Red one day, orange the next. Yellow followed by green […]

Masters of Fate: A Personal Report on the 2016 World Masters

By Alan Stapleton I am an average squash player, an ever-learning coach and a try-my-best administrator. Squash pulses passionately through my veins. When I heard the news that South Africa was hosting the 2016 World Masters, my bucket list became a little longer. An offer was made to print an extra thousand copies of my […]

Lighting Up Blue

By Will Carlin Rich Furman likes to fish. An architect by trade, Rich is a fifty-something squash coach with grey eyes that sometimes turn piercing blue, a ponytail and goatee, and a very lean build that serves him well both on the squash court and on the deck of a fishing boat. In the northeast, […]

Tennessee, Tennessee, Ain’t No Place I’d Rather Be

By John Branston Squash lovers, like stock pickers, are prone to be overly bullish. As a squash evangelist and former card-carrying, trend-spotting reporter, I have forecast seven of the last two surges in squash in my home state of Tennessee. But this time is different. Elvis played racquetball, on his own court at Graceland, right […]

Staying Alive

By Will Carlin Frenchman Mathieu Castagnet was tired. His opponent, Englishman Daryl Selby, knew this, and so perhaps he can be forgiven for being certain he’d won a point during a second-round match at the Windy City Open in Chicago. He just didn’t count on Castagnet pulling off one of the greatest recoveries of all […]

New Squash Documentary Takes a Look Behind the Glass

By James Zug Camera crews often come to film at urban squash programs. Usually they are making a short segment for local television. It is pretty common. George Polsky, the founder and executive director of StreetSquash, counted twenty different crews that visited his program. The twenty-first has stayed. Archimedia Films is making a feature-length documentary […]